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deena-gibbons

Professor Deena Gibbons

Associate Dean for Postgraduate Taught Studies

  • Professor in Early Life Immunology

Research interests

  • Immunology

Biography

Dr Deena Gibbons is a Professor in Early Life Immunology and & Associate Dean PGT in the School of Immunology & Microbial Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine at King's College London.

    Research

    gibbons-hero
    Gibbons Group

    Every year, 15 million babies are born prematurely and 1 million die as a consequence. My lab focuses on understanding immune cell development and function in human neonates, including both those born at term and prematurely. We have identified novel T cell effector functions in neonates and factors that affect immune cell development post birth. We have ongoing research in both areas. These studies will promote our understanding of the developing immune system in human infants to identify those more at risk from inflammation and infection and subsequently reduce infant mortality - a current NHS target and huge health burden.

    mother and child hands
    INSIGHT-2

    Mechanistic Studies into Pregnancy Complications and their Impact on Maternal and Child Health

    PISA Hero
    PISA: Prenatal drivers of infant ISlet Autoimmunity

    As childhood onset of T1D becomes more prevalent, there is an increasing need to understand how early life exposures could influence the development of the child and predispose to the development of autoimmunity.

    News

    Exposure to SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy impacts the developing immune system of the fetus

    New research from King’s suggests COVID-19 infection in the mother alters the immune system of the baby in utero.

    Pregnancy COVID-19

    Babies born prematurely can catch up their immune systems, study finds

    Researchers from King’s & Homerton University Hospital have found babies born before 32 weeks’ gestation can rapidly acquire some adult immune functions after...

    Premature babies can catch up immune systems

    Events

    13MarFoLSM Inaugural Lectures 2023-24 thumbnail

    Inaugural Lecture: Professor Christos Bergeles

    Inspiring talks from our new professor on re-engineering human sight

      Research

      gibbons-hero
      Gibbons Group

      Every year, 15 million babies are born prematurely and 1 million die as a consequence. My lab focuses on understanding immune cell development and function in human neonates, including both those born at term and prematurely. We have identified novel T cell effector functions in neonates and factors that affect immune cell development post birth. We have ongoing research in both areas. These studies will promote our understanding of the developing immune system in human infants to identify those more at risk from inflammation and infection and subsequently reduce infant mortality - a current NHS target and huge health burden.

      mother and child hands
      INSIGHT-2

      Mechanistic Studies into Pregnancy Complications and their Impact on Maternal and Child Health

      PISA Hero
      PISA: Prenatal drivers of infant ISlet Autoimmunity

      As childhood onset of T1D becomes more prevalent, there is an increasing need to understand how early life exposures could influence the development of the child and predispose to the development of autoimmunity.

      News

      Exposure to SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy impacts the developing immune system of the fetus

      New research from King’s suggests COVID-19 infection in the mother alters the immune system of the baby in utero.

      Pregnancy COVID-19

      Babies born prematurely can catch up their immune systems, study finds

      Researchers from King’s & Homerton University Hospital have found babies born before 32 weeks’ gestation can rapidly acquire some adult immune functions after...

      Premature babies can catch up immune systems

      Events

      13MarFoLSM Inaugural Lectures 2023-24 thumbnail

      Inaugural Lecture: Professor Christos Bergeles

      Inspiring talks from our new professor on re-engineering human sight