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Dr Neville Bolt

Dr Neville Bolt

  • Academics

Reader in Strategic Communications Education

Research subject areas

  • Conflict and security
  • Politics
  • Policy and society

Contact details

Biography

Dr Neville Bolt is the Director of the King’s Centre for Strategic Communications (KCSC), a leading global centre of expertise in Strategic Communications.

He is Reader in Strategic Communications and Convenor of the Masters programme in Strategic Communications in the Department of War Studies, King’s College London.

Dr Bolt is Editor-in-Chief of Defence Strategic Communications, the peer reviewed academic journal of NATO Strategic Communications Centre of Excellence. He is also Chief Academic Advisor to NATO’s Terminology Working Group.

He has co-convened the Masters course Evolution of Insurgency and Counterinsurgency. And he teaches the International Relations course Transnational Movements, Networks and Revolutionary Strategy.

He was the Teaching Excellence Award Winner 2017.

Dr Bolt has been a member of the Department of War Studies since 2006. Until then, much of his career was spent as a television journalist and producer-director at the BBC, ITV, and

CBC (Canada). Working in news and current affairs, he specialised in the production of war zone documentaries covering conflicts in Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and Indian subcontinent. Later he created strategic communications campaigns with the British Labour Party; Amnesty International; and the African National Congress (ANC)/Anti-Apartheid Movement.

 

Subject areas:

Strategic Communications – Theory and Practice

Persuasion and Coercion

Insurgency and Revolution

Transnational Movements and Networks

Imagery and Political Violence

 

Recent & Current PhD Supervision

Counter-conduct and resistance in contemporary social movements

Empathy in international negotiations

Trust and Revolution

Urban space and Strategic Communications discourse in Apartheid South Africa

Metaphors of containment in the Cold War