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Health

Nicotine Research Group - PhD Projects

Examining levels of e-cigarette related toxicants among those with mental health conditions who vape and smoke

Principal Investigator (NRG): Eve Taylor
Supervisors: Dr Deborah Robson and Professor Ann McNeill, with assistance from Mary Yates from SLaM and Tim Marczylo from PHE

This project is part of the NIHR Environmental Exposures Health Protection Research Unit (HPRU), led by Imperial College London in partnership with King’s College London, University of Cambridge and Public Health England. The HPRU aims to improve the understanding of the distribution, determinants and pathways linking these exposures to health effects, to provide scientific evidence that will impact directly on public health practice and policy. The current KCL project aims to assess levels of biomarkers of exposure and biomarkers of potential harm among people with a mental health condition who smoke or vape.

Developing the evidence base to address tobacco and cannabis co-use amongst young adults

Principle Investigator: Hannah Walsh
Supervisors: Dr Maria Duaso and Professor Ann McNeill

This mixed methods PhD includes a systematic review, a cross- sectional survey and qualitative interviews with further education students with the aim of informing a potential intervention to address tobacco and cannabis co-use. Funded by Nightingale PhD scholarship.

Improving the provision and uptake of smoking cessation treatment in primary care in the United Kingdom

Principle Investigator: Bernadett Tildy
Supervisors: Dr Leonie Brose and Professor Ann McNeill

This ESRC LISS DTP-funded PhD looks at how the provision and uptake of smoking cessation treatment in primary care could be improved to further reduce the prevalence of smoking, including reducing the prevalence of smoking in disadvantaged groups. Her work investigates health policies acting as implementation strategies which aim to increase the provision of licensed smoking cessation treatments and explores how electronic cigarettes (not currently medicinally licensed in the UK) may be involved in smoking cessation treatment provided in primary care.