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Book week is King's research legacy

Posted on 19/01/2017

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This week sees the launch of Academic Book Week 2017, the legacy of a research project involving academics from the Department of Digital Humanities at King's.

The week-long event, taking place from 23-28 January, includes a vote to find the public's number one from a list of 20 academic books that have shaped modern Britain. The books include Stephen Hawking’s A Brief History of Time, Judith Butler’s Gender Trouble, and John Berger’s Ways of Seeing.

The list, put together by leading UK academics, highlights books that have changed academic and popular thinking across art, science, politics, gender, cultural identity and law, and which continue to shape Britain today. You can vote at acbookweek.com

Academic Book Week grew out of the two-year AHRC-funded Academic Book of the Future research project, of which Professor Marilyn Deegan and Professor Simon Tanner were co-investigators. The project looked at how scholarly work in the Arts and Humanities will be produced, read, and preserved in coming years.  It explored key questions like “what is an academic book?”  “who reads them?”, “what can technology do to help make academic books more accessible?” and “how can we make sure academic books, whether print or electronic, are kept safe, and don’t disappear?”

As well as the public vote, Academic Book Week includes: 

  • Academic library events
  • Bookshop promotions
  • Publisher promotions
  • Bookshop events
  • Academic institution events
  • Social media activity and competitions

Search #AcBookWeek or visit acbookweek.com for more information.

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