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Researchers

Dr Alexander Schmotz

Research Associate

SchmotzDepartment of War Studies

Room K7.05

Strand, London WC2R 2LS

Email: alexander.schmotz@kcl.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research Interests

  • Stability and politics of autocratic and hybrid regimes
  • Quantitative methods, particularly survival analysis
  • Concept formation and measurement in comparative politics and democratization

Biography

Alexander Schmotz has been a research associate at the Department of War Studies at King’s College London since February 2014. His is currently working on the International Dimensions of Authoritarian Rule in an ERC-funded project led by Oisín Tansey. The project complements Alex’ previous work on domestic sources of autocratic stability at WZB Berlin Social Science Center.

Alexander got his PhD from Humboldt University Berlin in early 2014. His PhD thesis examines how hybrid regimes survive despite their institutional incoherence. He was enrolled on a stipend in the doctoral programme of Berlin Graduate School of Social Sciences at Humboldt. He holds an MA in Social Sciences from Humboldt, and studied political science and sociology in Berlin, Potsdam, and Bilbao. 

Selected Publications

Tansey, Oisín, Kevin Koehler, and Alexander Schmotz (2016): Ties to the Rest: Autocratic Linkages and Regime Survival. In Comparative Political Studies, published online before print.

Read a short version here on the Monkey Cage!

Schmotz, Alexander (2015): Vulnerability and Compensation: Constructing an Index of Co-optation in Autocratic Regimes. In European Political Science 14 (4), 439–457.

Awarded with the journal’s EPS Prize for best article 2015!

Møller, Jørgen, Alexander Schmotz, and Svend-Erik Skaaning (2015): Economic Crisis and Democratic Breakdown in the Interwar Years: A Reassessment. In Historical Social Research 42 (2), 301-318.

Golub, Jonathan and Alexander Schmotz (2014): Event History Analysis in the Study of Regime Change. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, August 28-31, Washington.

Gerschewski, Johannes, Wolfgang Merkel, Alexander Schmotz, Christoph H. Stefes, and Dag Tanneberg (2012): Warum überleben Diktaturen [Why Do Dictatorships Survive]? In Politische Vierteljahresschrift (Sonderheft 47), 106–131.

 

 

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