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Neuroscience & Mental Health

AFTER A STROKE, HOW CAN WE REPAIR THE BRAIN'S DEAD PARTS?

Regrow them.

Neuroscience and mental health

Researchers at King's College London and the Institute of Psychiatry have developed a therapeutic product (ReN001) that can theoretically help repair and renew brain tissue that has been damaged by stroke. 

Called the Pilot Investigation of Stem Cells in Stroke (PISCES), the clinical trial is the UK's first of a product containing manufactured neural stem cells. These cells are amazing because they can become any specialised cells that make up brain tissue.

Over the past decade, we’ve worked together with biotech company ReNeuron to develop and obtain approval for the trial of ReN001. This partnership has helped advance the crucial technology used to generate the neural stem cells that are the key component to ReN001. We are now able to get one neural stem cell to produce an infinite number of exact copies. Our research has also shown that rats who are disabled by a stroke improved when injected with these cells. 

Of the 150,000 people who suffer from stroke each year in the UK, half who survive are left with some form of disability due to the brain damage that occurs when the blood supply to the brain is cut off. Research led by Professor Jack Price, Professor of Development and Neurobiology at the Institute of Psychiatry, aims to harness the power of neural stem cells to help the brain recover from stroke. 

Early results of the PISCES trial are very positive. We’re one step closer to improving the outcome for patients affected by stroke. 


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