Skip to main content

Professor Malcolm Logan

Professor of Regenerative Biology

Biography

My lab studies the mechanisms controlling vertebrate limb development and the origins of diseases affecting the limbs.  We are combining work using animal models with analysis of human tissue samples. Our work focuses on two fundamental events: the early signals that recruit the initial cohort of limb bud progenitors and later morphogenesis events that organise these progenitor cells into mature limb tissues, particularly muscle and bone. We are interested in understanding how disruption of these events can explain the aetiology and pathology of congenital limb abnormalities and diseases affecting the musculoskeletal system. We are also studying how our knowledge of how tissues are constructed and maintained can be harnessed for regenerative strategies. We are exploiting our proximity to London hospitals to develop collaborative projects with colleagues in clinical genetics, plastics and orthopaedics departments. 

    Research

    banner-logan-group
    Logan Group

    The Logan Group in the Randall Centre for Cell & Molecular Biophysics

    Status not set
    From Dev Biology to Regen Medicine-hero
    From Developmental Biology to Regenerative Medicine

    Understanding organ development and tissue regeneration provides a framework for elucidating disease mechanisms as well as for developing new therapeutics.

    Status not set
    Cells
    King’s MechanoBiology Centre (KMBC)

    The King’s MechanoBiology Centre gives a common platform for researchers across different disciplines with complementary interests in mechanobiology

    Status not set

      Research

      banner-logan-group
      Logan Group

      The Logan Group in the Randall Centre for Cell & Molecular Biophysics

      Status not set
      From Dev Biology to Regen Medicine-hero
      From Developmental Biology to Regenerative Medicine

      Understanding organ development and tissue regeneration provides a framework for elucidating disease mechanisms as well as for developing new therapeutics.

      Status not set
      Cells
      King’s MechanoBiology Centre (KMBC)

      The King’s MechanoBiology Centre gives a common platform for researchers across different disciplines with complementary interests in mechanobiology

      Status not set