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Professor of Cell Biology
Professor of Cell Biology

Professor Jody Rosenblatt

Professor of Cell Biology

Research interests

  • Biomedical and life sciences

Biography

Jody Rosenblatt is Professor of Cell Biology in the Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine, School of Basic & Medical Biosciences and School of Cancer & Pharmaceutical Sciences who has recently moved her lab from the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah. During her PhD at the University of California, San Francisco with Dr Timothy Mitchison, she studied actin filament turnover and as a post-doc at the MRC-LMCB at University College London, she discovered epithelial cell extrusion, a process that eliminates dying cells without forming any gaps. Her lab studies how epithelia maintain constant cell numbers through cell death and cell division and have found that mechanical forces control each process; when cells become too crowded, they extrude some cells that later die and when cells are too sparse stretch activates cells to rapidly divide. Surprisingly, both opposing processes require the same stretch-activated calcium channel, Piezo1, depending on the force encountered. Extrusion is critical for regulating epithelial cell number, as they find that aggressive metastatic cancers and asthma can result from defective extrusion signalling. Understanding the basic cell biology of cell death is now revealing new etiologies for diseases that currently lack treatments. We believe that understanding the roots of disease will better pave the way to finding its cure, rather than merely managing its symptoms.

Visit the Rosenblatt Lab website

    Research

    Generic science
    Rosenblatt Group

    The Rosenblatt Group is part of the Randall Centre for Cell & Molecular Biophysics

    Rosenblatt Cancer lab 780x440
    Rosenblatt Laboratory

    We study how epithelia maintain a functional barrier and proper cell numbers, despite turning over at high rates by cell death and cell division.

    OILRIG
    Lipids and Membranes Research Interest Group

    A Lipids and Membranes Research Interest Group

    News

    New research describes for the first time a new mechanism that cancer cells use to invade

    Transparent zebrafish skin was used to explore how pre-cancerous cells behave, enhancing our understanding of how cancers progress.

    In this image a green transformed cell is seen migrating

    King's awarded multi-disciplinary Mechanobiology doctoral training scheme by Leverhulme Trust

    The Mechanics of Life Doctoral Scholarship Programme will draw on King’s research expertise in mechanobiology

    ARTICLE DNA

    Researchers awarded £3.5m to study how certain cells use and resist force

    Researchers have long understood that biochemical signals affect cells, and recently it has been recognised that mechanical forces regulate a wide variety of...

    An airway bronchoconstricting

      Research

      Generic science
      Rosenblatt Group

      The Rosenblatt Group is part of the Randall Centre for Cell & Molecular Biophysics

      Rosenblatt Cancer lab 780x440
      Rosenblatt Laboratory

      We study how epithelia maintain a functional barrier and proper cell numbers, despite turning over at high rates by cell death and cell division.

      OILRIG
      Lipids and Membranes Research Interest Group

      A Lipids and Membranes Research Interest Group

      News

      New research describes for the first time a new mechanism that cancer cells use to invade

      Transparent zebrafish skin was used to explore how pre-cancerous cells behave, enhancing our understanding of how cancers progress.

      In this image a green transformed cell is seen migrating

      King's awarded multi-disciplinary Mechanobiology doctoral training scheme by Leverhulme Trust

      The Mechanics of Life Doctoral Scholarship Programme will draw on King’s research expertise in mechanobiology

      ARTICLE DNA

      Researchers awarded £3.5m to study how certain cells use and resist force

      Researchers have long understood that biochemical signals affect cells, and recently it has been recognised that mechanical forces regulate a wide variety of...

      An airway bronchoconstricting