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Modules

Clinical Education Modules

Clinical Education Timetable 2018-19

Full Timetable (Terms 1 - 3)

Below are details of the modules available on Clinical Education. Students will be able to select their modules choices once accepted and enrolled onto the programme via their Student Record.

Each module has a brief overview video from the module leader. If you prefer, the below video playlist features videos for all modules available on the Clinical Education programme.

Core / Compulsary / Prerequisite

Fundamentals of Pedagogy (PgCert)

As the core module in the Postgraduate Certificate in Clinical Education, this module is focused on the theory and practice of teaching and learning in higher education in general, and in clinical education contexts in particular. The aim of the module is to encourage participants to explore and expand their notions of each of these concepts, with the help of existing research and theoretical literature and discussions in module sessions.


By the end of the module participants are expected to be able to:

  • critically evaluate theories of learning and teaching as applicable to higher education contexts;
  • analyse learning to ensure that it is appropriate and effective within the chosen context;
  • explore and critically evaluate models of design and development of learning.
Effective Teaching & Learning (PgCert)

As a compulsory module of the Postgraduate Certificate in Clinical Education this module gives participants the opportunity to use various frameworks and models to build on core pedagogical concepts. The module begins by considering the ways that clinical professionals learn about their practice and develop clinical expertise, and the evidence for various teaching methods used in clinical settings. As the module progresses participants will be able to consider how to modify their own teaching and learning environments so that it is more effective.

The aim of this module is to stimulate participants to critically analyse what effective clinical teaching and learning is. By the end of the module participants should be able to analyse critically the scholarly aspects of medical education, and have acquired a greater insight into the requirements for medical educators, especially for supervising learners in clinical settings.

As part of the module participants will have an opportunity to:

  • critically analyse the student-teacher dynamic involved in skills training and the characteristics of the effective technical skills training;
  • analyse the complex developmental nature of the clinical supervision process as it moves from a state of dependency to student autonomy;
  • analyse how the workplace-based assessments can be used in ways, both summative and formative, to document the acquisition of professional expertise;
  • become familiar with the current academic discourse surrounding portfolios, personal development plans, learning contracts, induction, and annual reviews, and be able to evaluate critically the benefits and possible drawbacks of these tools and their influence on reflective professional practice.
Observing Teaching (PgCert)

This compulsory module of the Postgraduate Certificate in Clinical Education enables participants to gain a comprehensive understanding of the process of teaching observation from the perspectives of both the observer and the observed, as a

tool for the professional development of clinical teachers.

By the end of the module participants are expected to be able to:

  • critically evaluate possible methods of teaching observation;
  • compare benefits of inter- and intra-disciplinary teaching observation;
  • compare the perspectives of the observer and the observed;
  • consider various theoretical lenses for the guidance of teaching observation;
  • reflect upon the relationship between teaching and learning.
Using Research in Clinical Education (Diploma)

This core module of the Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Education is designed to enable participants to become more critical and effective users of research in order to enhance their academic practice or practice as clinical educators. It seeks to develop participants’ ability to systematically and constructively critique methodologies and related methods used in investigating academic practice in higher education and clinical education, and to reflect on the significance and relevance of the research.

This module has been deliberately timetabled over five months to give participants sufficient time between sessions to read, to make sense of the readings, and to engage in online peer discussion.

By the end of the module participants will be able to:

  • demonstrate critical insights into the assumptions, values and beliefs that underpin different approaches to research into academic practice and reflect critically on their own values and beliefs in relation to these;
  • analyse the scope, function(s), and significance of research in higher education, including its relationship to institutional and national policy;
  • systematically and critically analyse research methodologies and methods for their appropriateness in specific contexts and their strengths and limitations;
  • select and apply appropriate criteria and review processes in order to evaluate research into academic practice in higher education, with particular reference to methodological complexity;
  • Understand complex ethical issues related to undertaking research into academic practice in higher education.
Researching Clinical Education (Diploma-Masters)

This module is optional for those participants wishing to conclude their studies at Postgraduate Diploma and core for those wishing to progress to the MA in Clinical Education. The module focuses on the processes of problematising an aspect of professional practice and then designing a research proposal to study it. Participants apply concepts and insights gained during the module ‘Using Research in Clinical Education’ to design a study enabling them to move from being effective users of research to becoming producers of research.

The research proposal provides an important bridge between the study of research into academic practice and the planning and implementation of a piece of research for a dissertation. For those who do not want to progress to the dissertation, the module provides the opportunity to plan a piece of research to systematically enhance an aspect of professional practice that they find problematic or challenging.

By the end of the module participants are expected to be able to:

  • adopt a reflexive stance to their academic practice that gives rise to significant questions they want to address;
  • critically analyse different research methodologies and methods to ascertain their strengths, limitation and appropriateness in relation to their own research questions;
  • be able to isolate, assess and resolve problems related to the design of their chosen research study;
  • reflect critically on ethical issues related to research into academic practice and formulate strategies to address them.
Dissertation (Masters)

The dissertation enables participants to demonstrate their ability to plan, carry out and evaluate a piece of research into higher education, or into education in their profession or in a clinical setting. The dissertation might, for example, present new evidence on a familiar aspect of teaching and learning; apply established models/theories to a new context; contribute to ongoing discourse about an aspect of practice, or present an independent critique of an existing body of theory. The dissertation forms a major part of the assessment for the MA in Clinical Education (60 credits or 33 per cent of the total work) and provides an opportunity to integrate what participants have learned from the different components of the Masters. It consists of an extended piece of written work of between 10,000 and 15,000 words.

You can take up to two years to complete the Dissertation Module.

Those who have completed the King’s College London Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Education will have already planned an inquiry into an aspect of higher education or clinical education and submitted it in the form of a research proposal as their assignment for the module Researching Clinical Education. The Dissertation module supports participants to translate their proposal into a dissertation. However, there is no requirement to take forward the research proposal previously submitted; circumstances change. This dissertation module will equally support those planning and implementing a new inquiry into an aspect of teaching and learning in clinical education.

Academic and clinical workloads mean that even the most enthusiastic participants may find it difficult to put aside regular time to make progress on their dissertation. Therefore the Dissertation Module is built on required sessions of peer review meetings and workshops to support gaining ethical approval, collecting data, analysing data, and writing research reports. 

Each participant will be assigned a dissertation supervisor with whom they will be expected to meet regularly for advice to support the planning and implementation of their research, and to provide feedback on their writing. These tutorials will be negotiated between the dissertation supervisor and each participant. There will be a series of deadlines that require participants to submit draft chapters from their dissertations at set times after their registration on the Module. 

Optional

Assessment in Clinical Education

This module is designed as to explore various approaches to assessment in the health professions, including the underpinning theories that are associated with these approaches. The competency approach to professional practice, which has become accepted across the health professions, is the conceptual starting point for work in the module. Building on this, however, participants will critically explore a combination of theoretical and empirical literature on assessment and will be challenged to think about other ways of conceptualising assessment of clinical training and practice.

The module will normally include five taught seminar sessions, and will require further engagement in an online discussion forum over the course of the academic term. Further, as a standard 15-credit module within the context of the MA in Clinical Education programme, the module will entail a significant amount of independent study that is shaped by the content of the seminars. On average, participants should expect to engage in up to 150 hours of work across the online engagement, preparation for and participation in the seminars, independent research, and preparation for and writing of the assessment.

The module aim is to provide participants an opportunity to research and analyse in depth the literature base of an agreed topic within academic practice or clinical educational practice.

Upon completion of this module, participants will be exptected to be able to:

  • Critically articulate the role of assessment as a central part of learning in clinical professions;
  • Identify, explain, and critique foundational assessment principles, tools, and approaches as they are used in clinical professions education;
  • Critically engage with approaches to feedback in clinical professions education.
Clinical Communication - Approaches to Teaching & Learning

The centrality of humane and effective clinical communication to the delivery of high quality healthcare is widely recognised (Suchman 2003; Makoul 2003; Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman 2015). As such, it forms a key component of health professional education (GMC 2013; NMC 2015) and continuing professional development. This module provides you with the opportunity to reflect on your own clinical communication practice and to develop your ability in supporting colleagues and students' development of clinical communication. It provides opportunity to critically engage with current approaches to clinical communication pedagogy, theory and research.

The module will normally include five taught seminar sessions, and will require further engagement in an online discussion forum over the course of the academic term. Further, as a standard 15-credit module within the context of the MA in Clinical Education programme, the module will entail a significant amount of independent study that is shaped by the content of the seminars. On average, participants should expect to engage in up to 150 hours of work across the online engagement, preparation for and participation in the seminars, independent research, and preparation for and writing of the assessment.

The module aim is to critically explore the theory and research that underpins clinical communication teaching and learning in clinical practice.

Upon completion of this module, participants will be expected to be able to:

  • Identify how the culture of health care and education is influenced by societal and political contexts and the relevance of this for communication in practice.
  • Critically evaluate the evidence base for clinical communication in practice and how it can be used to inform teaching. Explore and critique the conceptual models and frameworks which inform communication teaching from a clinical practice perspective.
  • Identify and critique current approaches to the teaching and development of clinical communication with particular reference to practice-based learning.
  • Critically articulate how assessment and appraisal processes may influence student and practitioners’ approaches to the development of clinical communication.
  • Identify through reflection, an aspect of clinical communication teaching or practice which can be enhanced or developed within your own clinical context / specialism.
Current Research & Innovations in Clinical Education (Diploma Level Only)

This module is designed as an opportunity to explore current issues in clinical educational research and practice in some depth, working with experts in the field of clinical education.

Building on the concepts explored in the core Postgraduate Certificate in Clinical Education modules, this options module is only suitable for those working at the Diploma stage of the programme. The module is an opportunity to explore the scholarly and research literature within one or more related areas of emerging importance in the field, and will be led as a ‘masterclass’ by a leading colleague who is conducting or participating in work in this topic area. Although the module is tutor-led, it will also include a fairly significant component of independent research and scholarship. As such, you will be responsible for conducting further research into the topical area and extending and developing your thinking based on your work in the module.

The module will typically include two full-day intensive seminars, and require further engagement in an online discussion forum over the course of a normal academic term. Further, as a standard 15-credit module within the context of the MA in Clinical Education programme, the module will entail a significant amount of independent study that is shaped by the content of the seminars. On average, participants should expect to engage in up to 150 hours of work across the online engagement, preparation for and participation in the intensive seminars, independent research, and preparation for and writing of the assessment.

The module aim is to provide participants an opportunity to research and analyse in depth the literature base of an agreed topic within academic practice or clinical educational practice.

Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this module, participants will be able to:

  • Conceptualise and articulate a topic area of research, scholarship, and innovation within clinical education that is applicable to their practice;
  • Engage critically with a range of theoretical, philosophical, and empirical literature in the topical area;
  • Synthesize existing theoretical, philosophical, and empirical literature in terms of implications for pedagogical practice.
e-Pedagogy

This option module is available to participants studying the Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice in Higher Education and the Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical education. It seeks to explore technology-mediated learning from a critical perspective, starting with the notion that an understanding of elearning and the successful use of new technologies in clinical teaching practice sits at the intersection of three different bases of knowledge: field- and discipline-specific ways of knowing and learning; a growing appreciation of the ways and means of teaching and learning; and an understanding of the ways in which technology can enhance and enable learning.

As part of the module, participants will have an opportunity to:

  • critically evaluate theory associated with pedagogy in the context of elearning;
  • explore the ways in which technology is used in higher education settings in general, and in clinical education in particular;
  • extend the conceptual boundaries of elearning beyond existing teaching settings and technologies.
Intercultural Clinical Education

Using facilitative, critical academic and experiential learning, this module introduces participants to current demographic changes in the world and the UK in particular, and the implications for healthcare. Participants are invited to bring their own experience for discussion, in dialogue with literature and other resources, about topics such as: how multiculturalism is shifting or impacting on clinicians’ everyday work; diversity; inequality and discriminationin education, healthcare and institutional systems; how culture and diversity affects clinician-patient relationships and interactions, and culture and diversity in institutional healthcare contexts. Participants will engage in a critical appraisal of existing models of dealing with cultural diversity, and an exploration of their fitness for clinical education and practice settings.

The aim of the module is to enhance participants’ cultural awareness and critically explore diversity issues in clinical education and clinical practice.

By the end of the module participants are expected to be able to:

  • develop a critical understanding of key concepts of culture and how they affect clinical decision making, motivation and behaviour;
  • reflect upon and critically explore individual beliefs and values of how knowing oneself as a starting point of intercultural learning;
  • critically examine current intercultural models used in clinical education and practice;
  • critically explore current models of intercultural clinical education and new methods in clinical education to prepare students, clinicians and trainers for a diverse globalised clinical work environment.

 

Interprofessional Education in the Clinical Context

There is now sufficient evidence to indicate that interprofessional education (IPE) enables effective collaborative practice, which in turn strengthens healthcare systems and improves outcomes. IPE enables two or more professions to learn with, from and about each other to improve collaboration and the quality of care (CAIPE, 2002).

This module will equip participants with knowledge and skills to promote and develop interprofessional education in their own clinical areas, by focusing upon the theoretical underpinnings of interprofessional education and how these can be practically applied in the clinical area. Focused inputs on key issues in IPE will offer a structure for further exploration, and participants will be invited to share and reflect upon their own experiences and ideas.

Participants will be expected to engage in active discussion in order to learn ‘with, from and about’ each other, thereby emulating the CAIPE definition of interprofessional education, and will be expected to participate in and then reflect upon interprofessional education activities organised for pre-registration clinical students within the university. Participants will also be invited to identify opportunities for interprofessional education in the own areas of practice, thereby integrating theoretical perspectives with the realities of practice.

The overall aim of the module is to critically explore the processes that underpin interprofessional education in the clinical setting.

By the end of the module participants are expected to be able to:

  • discuss national and international drivers that have influenced the development of interprofessional education and its relevance to contemporary healthcare provision;
  • critically evaluate the evidence base for interprofessional education;
  • explore and critique teaching strategies and the underlying theoretical concepts that can be utilised to enhance interprofessional learning;
  • reflect upon the knowledge, skills and attitudes required for facilitating interprofessional learning as applied to your own practice;
  • critically analyse the relationship between interprofessional education and the influence on the culture within which it operates.
NMC Teacher Compendium

 

This module is designed to develop research-led teachers in nursing and midwifery, and to further develop participants’ knowledge and skills as educators of nurses and midwives. This module must be taken as the options module at postgraduate certificate level by students wishing to the record a teaching qualification with the NMC (NMC Standards for Teachers/Practice Teachers of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting 2008).

The module uses a combination of teaching approaches, including lectures, seminars, online learning, and group tutorials. Its aims are to inspire advanced critical enquiry related to curriculum design and application; instigate critical reasoning in relation to teaching and learning strategies; and to allow participants to critically appraise assessment and evaluation practices in higher education and clinical practice. The module is designed to enable the participant to meet the NMC Teacher Standards (NMC 2008). Across the module activities, the participant will be expected to demonstrate professional values of educators as articulated by the UK Professional Standards Framework for Higher Education.

By the end of the module, participants are expected to be able to:
Facilitate the development, delivery and evaluation of education through:

  • Advanced critical review and synthesis of a range of learning strategies.
  • Developing academic practice with critical reference to the curriculum.
  • Demonstration of advanced strategies to assist the integration of learning from practice and educational settings.

Achieve advanced critical review and synthesis of a range of teaching strategies in order to:

  • Create an environment in which health care practice development is fostered, disseminated and evaluated.
  • Contribute to the processes of quality assurance and educational audit.
  • Utilise and evaluate a variety of teaching approaches appropriate to facilitation of learning with health care professional groups in health care or educational settings.

Develop a critical understanding of, and synthesise strategies for the assessment and evaluation of learning through:

  • Expert critical assessment of learning in both health care practice and educational settings.
  • Development and evaluation of strategies for providing feedback and developing further learning.
Models of Expertise

Expertise is a concept that is familiar to most people, but is an especially interesting one for healthcare professionals to consider. What do we mean when we say we are helping to develop expertise in our chosen clinical professions, or in our respective disciplines within those professions? What is an expert, in the context of clinical practice? What do patients expect of their clinicians in terms of expertise? How does the concept of expertise fit into the current discourse of competency in the health professions? This module is designed for participants to explore the history of expertise as a concept, and as a construct in educational research, and to become familiar with--and critically engage with--many of the current models of expertise that are used in clinical education settings. The aim of the module is to gain a comprehensive understanding of how the concept of expertise may be employed within clinical teaching.

Upon completion of the module, participants will be expected to be able to:

  • Examine the potential of the concept of expertise in clinical teaching;
  • Critically evaluate the utility and limitations of models of expertise within the clinical context;
  • Explore methods of elucidating, describing and visualising expertise;
  • Consider the potential of expertise as a threshold concept in the development of clinical pedagogy.

 

Professional Development in the Workplace

Through a facilitative approach participants engage with a series of frameworks and models relating to professional development in the workplace, which participants will critically evaluate in terms of their viability in the work contexts. The module uses small group exercises, discussions and presentations, as well as peer-supported collaborative activities. As with all modules participants are expected to undertake activities and critical reading between sessions on order to make the positive links between theory and practice.

By the end of the module participants are expected to be able to:

  • identify and evaluate critically a range of professional development approaches in the workplaces;
  • examine and develop the reflective practice skills of yourself and others; 
  • critically evaluate role modelling as a means of improving performance; 
  • critically evaluate appraisal, workplace assessment methods, objective and target setting and monitoring and review as part of professional development and performance management.

 

Simulation in Clinical Education

The module examines how an emerging set of technologies is changing the ways in which clinicians are educated. Participants explore the theoretical and practical basis for simulation, and consider the ways in which the modality is particularly suited to preparation for, and ongoing professional development in, clinical practice settings.

By the end of the module participants are expected to be able to:

  • critically analyse the current evidence-base for simulation training and related principles of adult learning with particular emphasis on experiential learning;
  • critically analyse the evidence of human factors training and the role it plays in preventing error and enhancing patient safety as it pertains to simulation training;
  • create their own development plan for simulation training relevant to their discipline and personal practice;
  • critically analyse the methodologies currently used to inform scenario design and the planning of learning objectives for simulation training, with particular relation to critical incident analysis;
  • critically evaluate the theories of group behaviours, communication skills, teamwork and team dynamics and critical analysis knowledge transfer and reflection that underpin simulation training, thereby allowing them to evaluate behaviours required to foster the simulation learning environment.
 
Clinical Education Prospectus
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